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When Anxiety or Depression Masks a Medical Problem

“A good reminder that mind and body are connected: symptoms of anxiety or depression can belie an as-yet undiagnosed physical disorder, and physical symptoms can stem from a psychological problem.”

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    ‘13 Reasons Why’ Through the Lens of A Clinical Psychologist

‘13 Reasons Why’ Through the Lens of A Clinical Psychologist

By Amy E. Ellis of Thrive Global
“13 Reasons Why”, a Netflix-original drama that boasts Selena Gomez as one of the executive producers, is a series that focuses on Hannah, a young high school girl who has recently committed suicide. She leaves behind carefully orchestrated narratives on cassette tapes in which she names individuals whom she alleges all had a role in her death. The show, and the book on which it is based, is a stunning demonstration of the raw emotion that ensues from bullying and rumors, rejection and isolation, and the everyday stressors and tribulations of adolescence.

Dreams and Dream Work in the Therapeutic Process

By Ursula Carsen, RP, CTP Dipl

I
When you are dealing with nightmares, recurring and puzzling dreams, or metaphors that are difficult to decipher, dream work as part of your therapeutic process can be particularly valuable. Dream work is like an expedition in uncharted territory: it helps you create a map of your inner landscape, and uncover treasures from the depths of your psyche’s mysteries. Shedding light on your dreams can be instrumental in the recovery from emotional problems and distress.

Choosing the Right Relationship

“The more important domains to consider are personality and values, and when it comes to personality, the key question is how does your potential partner handle stress.”

What Does Mindfulness Meditation Do to Your Brain?

“As the popularity of mindfulness grows, brain imaging techniques are revealing that this ancient practice can profoundly change the way different regions of the brain communicate with each other – and therefore how we think – permanently.”

Loneliness actually hurts us on a cellular level

A scientist explains how the pain of loneliness makes us sick:

Companionship is an asset for human survival, but its mirror twin, isolation, can be toxic. The very cells of people who live through periods of chronic loneliness look different. More specifically, the white blood cells of people who suffer through chronic loneliness appear to be stuck in a state of fear.

February 6th, 2017|Emotional Health, Loneliness|

Yes, It’s Your Parents’ Fault

“It’s called attachment theory, and there’s growing consensus about its capacity to explain and improve how we function in relationships.”

When I Finish Grieving

“My daily life is the working through of my losses.

My daily life happens on account of what has been taken away.

Everything I have and everything that I have lost is present. And if I can allow myself – that is my heart, body, soul, and mind – to traverse the terrain of myself. Then I am living.

There is no living apart from our losses.”

~ Alison Crosthwait

Why We Need To Talk About High-Functioning Depression

“High-functioning depression is when someone seems to have it all together on the outside, but on the inside, they are severely sad. Carol Landau, PhD, a clinical professor of psychiatry and human behavior and medicine at Brown University, says she primarily sees this in women with a penchant for perfectionism—AKA the same people who are likely your colleagues and friends with enviable lives and a long list of personal achievements.

“People often say being ‘high-functioning’ is better than being ‘low-functioning,’ but that’s not really true because the most important thing is for a depressed person to get help—which a high-functioning person is limiting herself from,” Landau says.”

September 29th, 2016|Depression, Emotional Health|

Why Millennials are Ready to Talk it Out

“Organizations like Toronto Psychotherapy Group, whose members provide professional help for a wide array of issues experienced by patients of all ages, are seeing a growing interest in talk therapy from millennials who are concerned about aspects of their mental health…..”