Depression

How Mindfulness May Change the Brain in Depressed Patients

“Harvard researchers use brain scans to explore how 8-weeks of training in present-moment awareness might break the cycle of self-rumination.”

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    Collision with Reality: What Depth Psychology Can Tell us About Victimhood Culture

Collision with Reality: What Depth Psychology Can Tell us About Victimhood Culture

“A diagnosis carries with it a sense of absolution. It isn’t our fault that we have anxiety or depression. Forces beyond our control have conspired against us… when our diagnosis becomes an important part of who we are, we are encouraged to abdicate responsibility for our plight. We are adrift on life’s turbulent currents, without blame, but also without agency. This fosters a sense of helplessness, which in turn can lead to increased anxiety.”

When Anxiety or Depression Masks a Medical Problem

“A good reminder that mind and body are connected: symptoms of anxiety or depression can belie an as-yet undiagnosed physical disorder, and physical symptoms can stem from a psychological problem.”

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    ‘13 Reasons Why’ Through the Lens of A Clinical Psychologist

‘13 Reasons Why’ Through the Lens of A Clinical Psychologist

By Amy E. Ellis of Thrive Global
“13 Reasons Why”, a Netflix-original drama that boasts Selena Gomez as one of the executive producers, is a series that focuses on Hannah, a young high school girl who has recently committed suicide. She leaves behind carefully orchestrated narratives on cassette tapes in which she names individuals whom she alleges all had a role in her death. The show, and the book on which it is based, is a stunning demonstration of the raw emotion that ensues from bullying and rumors, rejection and isolation, and the everyday stressors and tribulations of adolescence.

When I Finish Grieving

“My daily life is the working through of my losses.

My daily life happens on account of what has been taken away.

Everything I have and everything that I have lost is present. And if I can allow myself – that is my heart, body, soul, and mind – to traverse the terrain of myself. Then I am living.

There is no living apart from our losses.”

~ Alison Crosthwait

Why We Need To Talk About High-Functioning Depression

“High-functioning depression is when someone seems to have it all together on the outside, but on the inside, they are severely sad. Carol Landau, PhD, a clinical professor of psychiatry and human behavior and medicine at Brown University, says she primarily sees this in women with a penchant for perfectionism—AKA the same people who are likely your colleagues and friends with enviable lives and a long list of personal achievements.

“People often say being ‘high-functioning’ is better than being ‘low-functioning,’ but that’s not really true because the most important thing is for a depressed person to get help—which a high-functioning person is limiting herself from,” Landau says.”

September 29th, 2016|Depression, Emotional Health|

Why Millennials are Ready to Talk it Out

“Organizations like Toronto Psychotherapy Group, whose members provide professional help for a wide array of issues experienced by patients of all ages, are seeing a growing interest in talk therapy from millennials who are concerned about aspects of their mental health…..”

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    Holocaust survivors can genetically pass trauma down to their children

Holocaust survivors can genetically pass trauma down to their children

“The real message from this work is about the power of environment,” Yehuda said. “If negative environments cause one kind of change, what kind of changes are caused by positive environments? And how can we optimize our environment so we’re functioning in the best way possible and that we’re making the biologic changes that really are most optimal for us to achieve maximum resilience.”

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    5 Reasons Why Psychoanalysis Is One of The Best Treatments For Early Childhood Trauma

5 Reasons Why Psychoanalysis Is One of The Best Treatments For Early Childhood Trauma

“The impact of early childhood trauma is that much more pronounced later in life precisely because there have never been words to describe or capture the traumatic experience. Usually, in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, one can begin to unravel the layers of the experience, slowly and often through speaking about the current symptoms that bother you or your body, which may include anxiety, substance use, self-injurious behavior, psycho-somatic symptoms, etc.”

It’s Not Always Depression

“…there are basically two categories of emotions. There are core emotions, like anger, joy and sadness, which when experienced viscerally lead to a sense of relief and clarity (even if they are initially unpleasant). And there are inhibitory emotions, like shame, guilt and anxiety, which serve to block you from experiencing core emotions.”