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Why We Need To Talk About High-Functioning Depression

“High-functioning depression is when someone seems to have it all together on the outside, but on the inside, they are severely sad. Carol Landau, PhD, a clinical professor of psychiatry and human behavior and medicine at Brown University, says she primarily sees this in women with a penchant for perfectionism—AKA the same people who are likely your colleagues and friends with enviable lives and a long list of personal achievements.

“People often say being ‘high-functioning’ is better than being ‘low-functioning,’ but that’s not really true because the most important thing is for a depressed person to get help—which a high-functioning person is limiting herself from,” Landau says.”

September 29th, 2016|Depression, Emotional Health|

Why Millennials are Ready to Talk it Out

“Organizations like Toronto Psychotherapy Group, whose members provide professional help for a wide array of issues experienced by patients of all ages, are seeing a growing interest in talk therapy from millennials who are concerned about aspects of their mental health…..”

Spiritual Emergency – Treatment of Psychosis

“Current, medical treatments suppress symptoms but long-term use hinders the process of new self-construction…research tells us that we should use our medications carefully, sparingly, and temporarily. We should always use them in conjunction with serious psychotherapy that aims to help personal reintegration (not just superficial ‘counselling’ about ‘how to live with your illness’).

Healing must involve a new integration of deep, inner parts of the person and deep, transpersonal forces beyond the person.”

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    The Play Deficit – Children today are suffering a severe deficit of play

The Play Deficit – Children today are suffering a severe deficit of play

“…But here’s an alternative view, which should be obvious but apparently is not: playing is learning. At play, children learn the most important of life’s lessons, the ones that cannot be taught in school. To learn these lessons well, children need lots of play — lots and lots of it, without interference from adults.”

5 smart tips for hiring the right therapist

“Finding a good therapist can be a daunting task. But with therapy, more than almost anything else, it’s the relationship between client and therapist that matters most.”

How Childhood Trauma Could Be Mistaken for ADHD

“Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behavior may in fact mirror the effects of adversity, and many pediatricians, psychiatrists, and psychologists don’t know how—or don’t have the time—to tell the difference. ”

What A ‘Pre-Divorce’ Couple Looks Like

“…in order for therapy to be effective, both people are going to have to tolerate learning something about themselves they don’t already know. No one escapes therapy with their self-image completely intact. This is a good thing. Of course, just being alive in the world with other people also invites us to see ourselves as others see us. But therapy expands on this process — hopefully, in a helpful way.”

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    Holocaust survivors can genetically pass trauma down to their children

Holocaust survivors can genetically pass trauma down to their children

“The real message from this work is about the power of environment,” Yehuda said. “If negative environments cause one kind of change, what kind of changes are caused by positive environments? And how can we optimize our environment so we’re functioning in the best way possible and that we’re making the biologic changes that really are most optimal for us to achieve maximum resilience.”

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    5 Reasons Why Psychoanalysis Is One of The Best Treatments For Early Childhood Trauma

5 Reasons Why Psychoanalysis Is One of The Best Treatments For Early Childhood Trauma

“The impact of early childhood trauma is that much more pronounced later in life precisely because there have never been words to describe or capture the traumatic experience. Usually, in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, one can begin to unravel the layers of the experience, slowly and often through speaking about the current symptoms that bother you or your body, which may include anxiety, substance use, self-injurious behavior, psycho-somatic symptoms, etc.”

It’s Not Always Depression

“…there are basically two categories of emotions. There are core emotions, like anger, joy and sadness, which when experienced viscerally lead to a sense of relief and clarity (even if they are initially unpleasant). And there are inhibitory emotions, like shame, guilt and anxiety, which serve to block you from experiencing core emotions.”